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Recent scientific studies substantiate what many marijuana users have claimed all along — that it enhances sexual relations. Currently, almost all research into the effects of the cannabis plant is prohibited by the U.S. government due to its classification as a Schedule I substance. However, 31 states and the District of Columbia have legalized medical marijuana, while nine states have also legalized adult use of recreational marijuana. Legalization benefits academia, as it finally allows researchers to study and analyze marijuana’s effects, including its impact on sexual intercourse.

According to a research study in the Journal of Sexual Medicine (JSM), entitled the Association Between Marijuana Use and Sexual Frequency in the United States: A Population-Based Study, the goal of the study was, “To elucidate whether a relation between marijuana use and sexual frequency exists using a nationally representative sample of reproductive-age men and women.”

The analysis represented 28,176 women and 22,943 men nationwide who were surveyed by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) via a questionnaire. The CDC’s broad, all-encompassing survey is often utilized by researchers as a basis for further, more specific analysis.

Researchers Dr. Michael L. Eisenberg and Dr. Andrew J. Sun are both affiliated with the Department of Urology, at Stanford University, in California. The duo accessed the CDC’s study to research marijuana’s effects on male sexual and reproductive function, which is Dr. Eisenberg’s area of expertise. As such, he sees men with various forms of sexual dysfunction. As for medical or lifestyle factors that may influence function, he is often asked about what role, if any that marijuana may play.

The clinical implications of their study revealed that “Marijuana use is independently associated with increased sexual frequency and does not appear to impair sexual function.” In fact, daily users across all demographic groups reported having 20% more sex than those who have never used cannabis.

Dr. Eisenberg thinks doing more research in this area is important. Previously, most doctors had generally counseled men that marijuana, like tobacco, is harmful. However, his current study suggests that may not be the case.

An additional JSM-published study entitled, The Relationship Between Marijuana Use Prior to Sex and Sexual Function in Women, conducted at Saint Louis University in Missouri claims, “The internet is rife with claims regarding the ability of marijuana to improve the sexual experience; however, scientific data is lacking.” The objective of this study “is to determine if marijuana use before sex affects the sexual experience, by how much, and which domains of sexual function are affected.”

In this survey, researchers polled 133 sexually-active adult women at one particular, academic ObGyn practice, during their annual check-ups. The female patients filled out a lengthy questionnaire regarding marijuana use before sex (hashtag #MUBS).

Thirty-eight women (29%) disclosed consuming cannabis prior to copulation. Of those 38 women, 68 percent reported more pleasurable sex, 16% said it ruined their sexual experience, while the remaining 16% were undecided or unaware.

Among the enhanced sexuality camp, 72% said it always increased their erotic pleasure, while 24% said it sometimes did. Almost 62% said it enhanced the quality of their orgasms and their libidos in general. Additionally, 16% of MUBS adherents disclosed they purposefully puff pot prior to sex, specifically to relieve any potential pain associated with the act. There were conflicting reports as to whether or not it enhanced vaginal lubrication.

The same research team later widened the scope of their survey to 289 adult MUBS women, with similar results: 65% decided it enhanced their sexual experience, 23% said it did not matter one way or the other, 9% had no significant feedback and 3% said it sabotaged their sexual experience.

Dr. Monica Grover of Asira Medical is double Board certified in Family Medicine and Gynecology, with practices in both Midtown, Manhattan and Westchester, New York. Although she did not participate in either clinical study, she is currently conducting independent research.

“Although some studies have shown results that are equivocal, anecdotally patients have reported positive feedback,” says Dr. Grover.

“Consumption of small quantities [of marijuana] prior to sex may increase libido in female patients, which in turn can release positive endorphins and increase vaginal lubrication.”

Dr. Grover believes this may be due to the short-term anxiolytic of cannabis.  In women. Reduced sexual libido in women usually correlates with any anxiety or stress they are experiencing. So, in the short-term, cannabis has anxiety-reducing effects. However, in the long-term, it can increase anxiety, which may explain the lack of libido in possible habitual users. Dr. Grover is currently working on a study to determine this theory.

Notable clinical implications among male users reported in the Stanford study were that Cannabis does not impair sexual function nearly as much as alcohol does. Nor are there any contraindications of mixing marijuana with other drugs for sexual performance enhancement such as Viagra or Cialis.

Additionally, and perhaps most importantly, unlike alcohol, so far there is no direct correlation between marijuana consumption and a significantly increased risk of fatalities.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), an estimated 88,0008 people (approximately 62,000 men and 26,000 women) die from alcohol-related causes annually, making alcohol the third leading preventable cause of death in the United States.  The Journal of the American Medical Association corroborates these findings. The first preventable cause of death in the United States is tobacco use and the second is poor diet combined with physical inactivity. These findings may help build the case for consuming cannabis to become more sexually active to benefit one’s overall health.

 New Studies Show That Marijuana Enhances And Increases Sex – Forbes

Like cannabis, chocolate is known to offer medicinal benefits and is known to boost euphoria. Turns out the the cacao plant used to make chocolate provides more than just a rich, silky, delicious flavor. And thanks to progressive cannabis laws in many states, you can combine these two powerhouses.

 

To celebrate World Chocolate Day — July 7 — we’ve listed a few of our favorite infused canna-cacao treats that elevate your taste buds and boost up wellness.

Buddha’s Best White Chocolate Macadamia Cookie

 

Buddha’s Best crushes the game with the White Chocolate Macadamia Cookie. The white chocolate frosting instantly melts in your mouth to coat taste buds with the sweet and rich flavors of the cookie. The dense, Ghirardelli chocolate-frosted cookie contains the perfect frosting-to-cookie ratio with a sprinkle of Macadamia nuts. These cookies are potent, so be sure to know your dose before consuming.  Users with nut allergies should check the packaging before consuming.

 

Coda Signature’s The Crescendo Collection

Coda Signature of Colorado will make its way into the California market soon. This decadent box of truffles won best edible at the 2016 Colorado Cannabis Cup and maintains its reputation as one of the strongest, most luxurious edibles on the market. Each box comes with three handmade truffles, and Coda Signature uses artisan ingredients to craft these chocolate confections. Earl Grey is a crowd-pleasing favorite. The flavor of the tea steeped in milk chocolate balances the rich chocolate taste with a faint citrus burst. If slight citrus tones and soft lavender flavors don’t tickle your fancy, take a bite of the burnt caramel truffle and taste the silky-but-spiked caramel essence topped with Maldon salt crystals. Still to heavy for your buds? Try juniper lemon, a white chocolate truffle lightly scented with juniper berries and zesty lemons.

Bhang Bar Cookies and Cream Chocolate

 

Bhang bars are classic. If you’re a seasoned consumer, chances are you’ve tried or heard of Bhang. With more than 25 years of chocolate-making experience, its artisan chocolate bars kill the competition. The award-winning Cookies and Cream Bhang bar is a classic white chocolate bar with crunchy chocolate cookie bits. Clocking in at 180 mg of THC, this hybrid heavy hitter smacks you in the face with its triple strength canna-chocolate fusion. Thankfully, our Bhangin’ friends have split the bar up into 45 mg bites, so you can enjoy the perfect amount of chocolate at the appropriate dosage.

Kiva Confections Terra Bites

 

Kiva ConfectionsTerra Bites are insanely delicious! If the thought of chocolate-coated, caffeinated canna bites sounds a tad contradictory, Kiva will have you eating your words in no time. One bite of these 5 mg chocolate-covered espresso beans can easily become two, and maybe eventually 10 if you’re not careful. You may be thinking “5 mg of THC? How much harm can that do?” Because edibles are difficult to dose, don’t get carried away with that mindset. These bite-sized treats do not leave a weedy aftertaste, and have the capacity to unleash your inner social butterfly — as long as you don’t go overboard.

Flav Chocolate Toffee Bar

 

For those who don’t wish to get high, but want the benefits of chocolate and CBD, Flav packs its incredible Chocolate Toffee bars with 180 mg of CBD. Divided into 18-pieces, Flav’s canna-chefs use cocoa butter, toffee pieces, and cannabis oil to keep the cannabinoids as potent as the flavors. Thanks to Flav’s use of only CBD, this chocolate confection is the perfect non-psychoactive treat to ease symptoms of discomfort and relieve pain. Each product is lab-tested, so you know you are still getting the best of the best.

Leif Goods Peanut Butter and Jelly Bar

Another treat that won’t get you high, Leif GoodsPeanut Butter and Jelly bars are branded inside and out, so you won’t forget where your cacao came from. Leif Medicinals crafts organic and vegan-friendly treats then infuses each with CBD. The Peanut Butter and Jelly bars are made with 66 percent organic dark chocolate with peanut butter and strawberry powder. Each bite of this chocolate bar tastes like a chocolate-covered strawberry Uncrustable and contains a high ratio of CBD for a pain-free and pleasurable snacking experience.

Korova Mini Cookies

Known for powerful edibles like the 1,000-mg Black Bar, Korova has dosed it down and made it easier for consumers to enjoy infused chocolate chip cookies without feeling too toasty. Korova Mini chocolate chip cookies are available in a 10-pack with 100 mg of THC total. Each cookie contains 10 mg of THC, smoothly blended into the cookie batter to mask the taste of weed. Like with any sweet treat, moderation is key. Don’t overbake your cookies — or yourself.

Sensi Chew Insomnia

 

Sensi Chew carries a line of infused chocolates designed to target specific issues, including lack of energy and insomnia. The Insomnia Plus formula contains 4 mg of melatonin, a supplement that helps regulate sleep patterns, along with a total of 100 mg of THC. Stop counting sheep and treat yourself to sweet solid zzz’s with Sensi Chew Insomnia. These medicated chocolate caramel squares are divided into four 25 mg THC doses, but if you’re still a novice when it comes to edibles, start off with half the recommended dosage and increase as needed.

 How Sweet It Is! Nibble on These Edibles for World Chocolate Day – Marijuana

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